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Manuscript of the eighth Breton lecture delivered on February 12th, 1946. Through topics such as Dada, Tanguy, Dalí, Ernst and Futurism, André Breton "returns to the antinomy of necessity and freedom" (Inédits I [Unpublished Texts] I, t. III, 1992, p. 1243).

The eighth lecture of Breton bears the trace of haste; the events shaking up the program (Pierre Mabille himself will have to leave the island in March), the poet declares from the outset that he will give several lectures in one; eleven were planned in all. The lecture focuses on the idea of freedom and on the conflicting and problematic relations of art with convention, through a quick presentation on Dada, and the work of some surrealist painters (Tanguy, Dalí, Max Ernst) and finally Futurism. The text was published in Inédits I (Unpublished Texts I) of the third volume of the Pléiade. [Atelier André Breton website, 2005].

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946.
Eighth lecture, autograph manuscript, February 12th, 1946.

- 12 pages grand in-4° Autograph manuscript in ink with numerous erasures and corrections by Breton of this eighth lecture given in Haiti on the avant-garde movement.

“The Eskimos of which I showed to you last week, who make poetically interesting masks, seem very wise to me when, gathered on the occasion of a celebration, they organize a sort of competition between the ceremony masks newly designed based on their favorite which is the one that makes them laugh the most. It is indeed a distortion of the “civilized” mind to think that to laugh in front of a piece of art is necessarily disparaging. On the contrary, the modern mind laughs in front of a piece of art in order to show its provocative nature, and that this provocative nature stands in turn for the originality of this piece of art characterized externally by its uniqueness”. [...]

“Because of the new conditions in Europe created by the war, disrespect has increased tremendously, a negation of the generally admitted values strives to become total, strikingly, both among the "victors" and among the "vanquished." The intellectual despair is the same, and only what I call "black humor” helps to overcome it: in New York Duchamp signed a reproduction of The Mona Lisa adorned with a lovely moustache; in Cologne, visitors to the Max Ernst’s exhibition must enter and exit through public urinals; in Paris, Picabia conceived of a picture made of an empty frame nailed to the floor with strings tightened across it and with a living monkey chained to it, in Hanover, Schwitters is using a technique of collage, simple assemblage, to engage in erecting an indefinite and unachievable monument adding day-to-day all kinds of materials unsuitable for use including household waste. [...]

“I agree, naturally, that "The Bride Stripped Bare" is at first glance a hermetic work. Because of the lack of time I can only advise those interested to refer to the paper I wrote about it in my book "Surrealism and painting". "The Bride Stripped Bare" is the greatest work of imagination of the 20th century on a purely artistic field. And presently it is also the one which displays the greatest power of repercussion."

This signed autograph manuscript includes also a number of texts assembled and glued together by Breton. [Auction catalogue, 2003]

 

Bibliography

- André Breton (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), Inédits I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 322-342.

Creation date12 fév.-46
Bibliographical material12 pages grand in-4°
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs et Ts - encre bleue et crayon
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100102330
Place of origin

Description

Manuscript of the seventh lecture of Breton in Port-au-Prince, given on February 8th, 1946. It will be published in the Pléiade library in 1992.

The seventh lecture of Breton in Port-au-Prince, was given towards the beginning of February 1946, in a rather troubled context; the events occurred in a rushed manner (a political agitation which brought about the departure of the president, and in which, even if it has been exaggerated, the Breton lectures apparently had their impact: see the notes of volume III in the Pléiade on Breton’s lecture at the Savory Club, in Alentours I). Breton speaks of Rimbaud and Mallarmé, which isn’t without interest for us, because his work rarely refers to the second, often masked by Valéry. The text of this lecture has been published in the Inedits I (Unpublished Texts I) of the third volume of the Pléiade.

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946.
Seventh lecture, autograph manuscript, February 8th, 1946.

- 6 pages, large folio in-4°, autograph manuscript, written by Breton, including corrections of this seventh lecture relating to the poetic work of Stéphane Mallarmé and Rimbaud.

"For Mallarmé, in the sonorous envelope of a word, there exists a "real essence": close to the primary organism of life, says Mallarmé, the word presents in its vowels and diphthongs, a kind of flesh, but the spirit that animates it participates more in a fallen world that delivers our senses from an ideal mode, than the lost beauty of our dream "pressing against a past heaven." It is not an exaggeration to say that Mallarmé, searches here, to convey prerogatives of the divine verb.

“That is, gentlemen, narrated in terms as concisely as possible, the unique life Rimbaud. Let’s not forget that the poet’s work – consisting of the poems in Illuminations and in Saison en enfer – ends in 1873, i.e. when Rimbaud was 19 years old, and that during the 18 years of the second part of his life he showed not the least willingness to return to his poetical activity, and moreover behaved in all as if it never had existed, dismissing it with a foul and irrevocable epithet whenever someone alluded to it in his presence. One has naturally gone on and on arguing and still can argue about so definite a meaning of such a contemptuous renouncement. Among the assumptions advanced, none of which can pretend to be restrictive of the others, the one that stands out most for me - maybe because it is simply the most human - is the one confidentially given by the two young authors [of a show], played in Paris in the wake of the War entitled "Rimbaud, the lost child". [According to them, the desire of Rimbaud to express himself couldn’t survive the pistol shot in Brussels and the ensuing police interrogation. It had been for him a profanation of the poetic origin itself.” [Auction catalogue, 2003]

 

Bibliography

- André Breton, (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), Inédits I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 312-322.

Creation date8 fév.-46
Bibliographical material6 pages foliotées grand in-4°
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs - encre bleue et crayon
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100657520
Place of origin

Description

Manuscript of the sixth lecture given by Breton at Port-au-Prince (Haiti) on February 5th, 1946, and which would be published in 1992 by Gallimard [Publishing] House.

A little shorter than its predecessors, this is the sixth of a series of eight lectures published by Breton at Port-au-Prince (Haiti) in December 1945 and January-February 1946. Devoted to the origins of modern poetry, from Nerval to Baudelaire, the text is a audacious piece of writing (evoking the “gravestone chill” of such poems as those of Vigny...). We see Breton the pedagogue, being careful to share his knowledge, which is also a sensibility [taste]; he does so in order to share his love of minor authors like Petrus Borel, or overlooked authors like Aloysius Bertrand. Such is recounted in the third volume of the Pléiade, in the section Inédits I (Unpublished Works I). [Atelier Andre Breton website, 2005]

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946
Sixth lecture, original manuscript, February 5th, 1946.

-9 pages, folio in-4°, original manuscript of the first draft with words crossed out and corrections by Breton’s pen of this 6th lecture, regarding poetry.

“No one will contradict, for example, that for the European the foundation of this treasure is represented by the Iliad and the Bible. It is clear that even he who would not have directly been in contact with these two monuments of human thought, or from which, for deliberate reasons, would disagree with them in the greatest deference, wouldn’t be any less in their unknown and whatever their existence, largely dependent upon the manner of conceptualization and response. It is this strong lineage, these ties, which, one has to admit, are proving to be nowadays still unbroken [...]

This is thus what I consider the works for which I have chosen to make the object of this talk. Certain texts have been systematically seen by the opposite end of the spyglass, this is the case, we have said, of that of Victor Hugo, of others who pull great consequence in the social sphere, with those like Charles Fourier, who have long been the prey of irony, others during the lifetime of their authors have passed almost unnoticed like that of Aloysius Bertrand, others have been dismissed as insane like that of Nerval or of Lautréamont, and others finally have been deemed an opprobrium, like that of Borel, Baudelaire, or Rimbaud.”

This manuscript includes some clippings of which a few are printed matter. [Auction catalogue, 2003]

 

Bibliography

- André Breton, (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), Inédits I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 295-311.

Creation date5 fév.-46
Bibliographical material9 pages in-4°
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs - encre bleue
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , , , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100339380
Place of origin

Description

Manuscript of the Fifth Lecture by André Breton in Haiti, this time regarding modern art, held on January 29, 1946. This text, which deals with collages, Cubism, and Surrealism, will be published in the Inédits I (Unpublished Texts I) of the Pléiade in 1992.

The fifth Breton conference in Haiti, likely held on January 29, 1946, dealt with modern art, as sort of a follow-up to the third conference devoted to the birth of this art, of Romanticism in Seurat and Le Douanier Rousseau. Breton turns now to movements of which he is a contemporary, with men that he himself associated: such as Matisse, Cubism, Picasso; but he also takes the opportunity to evoke primitive objects, in a very precise commentary that deserves recognition. The text that we have a draft of here appears in the third volume of the Pléiade, in the section Unpublished Texts I. [Atelier André Breton Website, 2005]

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946. Fifth Lecture, original manuscript, January 29, 1946 —12 pages in-4° First draft manuscript with many deletions and corrections from this 5th conference held in Haiti on contemporary painting.

“France has garnered worldwide renown, an unmatched prestige which unfortunately is seen so little (I think of the incredibly hesitant and tardy nature of acquisitions made in France by the state, the inability it has shown to exempt the masterpieces of artists such as Seurat from international trade, which only one painting is, due to the generosity of an American collector) in the darkest days of this last war, I can testify in full conscience and objectivity that it is the painting of Paris, especially the modern painting of the Paris School which, in the United States, was the great ambassador of French thought. I say that this painting, especially that which spans from Cézanne to the Surrealists in the worst moments of depression caused by the uncertain fate of war and all sorts of threats that enemy occupation posed to France, I say that this painting continued to attract thousands of views daily that, if not from connoisseurs and devotees, were at least from people willing to know and love it. […]"

Henri Kahnweiler, who was the dealer of Cubist painters between 1910 and 1914, that is to say when they were most discussed, what am I saying, the most scorned, and when they had only one or two critics—but these critics or one of these two critics is a genius poet, Guillaume Apollinaire—M. Henri Kahnweiler provides in Art Notebooks from 1940-1944 a very precious eyewitness testimony on this question of collected papers and the role they have in Cubism. Although probably to spare that ego, he refrains from identifying the inventor of the method, I believe that without great risk of error we can attribute the responsibility not to Picasso but to Georges Braque. This problem of focusing on such a subject also loses much of its significance from the time where it is known that Picasso and Braque, from 1910-1913, work hand in hand and share in every respect the stubborn desire to achieve an impersonal execution, the conviction that the ‘hand’ of the painter’s ‘personal writing’ should not be discerned in the work.” [Auction catalogue, 2003]

 

Bibliography

- André Breton, (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), Inédits I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 274-295.

Creation date29 janv.-46
Bibliographical material12 pages in-4°
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs - encre bleue et crayon
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100648690
Place of origin

Description

Texte manuscrit de la quatrième conférence, prononcée le vendredi 25 janvier 1946 et qui sera reprise dans les Inédits I du troisième volume de la Pléiade en 1992.

After his arrival at Port-au-Prince with Elisa on December 4th, 1945, Breton gave a series of conferences starting from the 20th. We have here the text from the fourth lecture, given around January 25th, 1946, which will be included in the Inédits I (Unpublished Texts I) of the third volume of the Pléiade. Beginning with his thoughts on liberty and commenting on Helvétius, Breton undertakes an intellectual path that is quite political, particularly in regards to the utopists of the first part of the nineteenth century: Saint-Simon, Father (Barthélemy Prosper) Enfantin, and his great teacher, Charles Fourier, who Breton had only just discovered two or three years earlier, and to whom he began the year before to consecrate the famous “Ode,” and who constantly occupied his thoughts during the following decade.

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946.
Fourth Lecture, Manuscript, January 25th, 1946.

- 15 pages folio in-4°, first draft manuscript in ink with numerous deletions and corrections made by André Breton. The lecture discussed: liberty, Saint-Simon and Charles Fourier.

"We cannot be surprised in these conditions that men from all of France, have incarnated the ideal of liberty and have been martyrs during the French Revolution, have never been asked to speak of liberty. It is like a thing on which all honest people agree, and about which we have avoided disagreements when we want at all costs, to define it.

"Henri de Saint-Simon was mayor of Paris in 1760 (he is therefore of the same generation as Lafayette and Danton) and belonged to the elite French aristocracy and attributed himself with titles of nobility as he pretended to be a descendent of Charlemagne, which did not keep him from renouncing, most willingly, his own titles under the revolution in order to become Simon, the citizen. I'm telling you this from the beginning so that you can quickly understand the depth of his character - all while being of aristocratic origins, Saint Simon never let his love for the people be compromised.

"The passions, according to Fourier are universally good; asceticism deceives itself in denying them, and it is upon the passions that our future society should be built. It is precisely the restraint -- today we would say the repression of passion-- that holds vice. This vice will disappear in a good social organization where the passions will no longer be driven away, but encouraged, and where it will be necessary to surveil their judicious use." [Auction catalogue, 2003]

 

Bibliography

- André Breton (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), Inédits I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 252-274.

Creation datesd [1946]
Bibliographical material15 pages in-4°
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs et imp [article] - encre bleue et crayon
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100361470
Place of origin

Description

Third lecture in a series of eight that André Breton gave in Haiti in December 1945-1946. This one was given on January 22nd 1946.

Having arrived in Port-au-Prince with Elisa on December 4th, 1945, Breton gave a series of talks starting on the 20th; he had planned eleven, but ultimately gave eight. [Atelier André Breton website, 2005; André Breton website, 2014]

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946.
Manuscript, 22 January 1946.

The first draft of a manuscript written in ink with André Breton’s markings and corrections (13 folio pages). From the third lecture Breton that gave in Haiti on master painters: Delacroix, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Seurat, and Le douanier Rousseau.

“Van Gogh presents to you here one of the great masterpieces, “The Starry Night,” which possesses a truly mystical fever. One could say that he is the convulsive painter of the tree, of the twisting path, of the little dry-stone wall which embraces a field in Provence. All that his brush touches, all that is born of such skill, hatching like sparks from serpentine flames, acquires an extraordinary animistic quality.

“These elements of great humor, and the magic of a certain light drives the unusual distribution of organic elements, which take on even more importance in the “parade” of 1886. From a vulgar spectacle enters everything, a circus display succeeds in extracting a bit of sacred illumination which redirects it towards the eternal. Your attention will concentrate on the central musician whose silhouette is that of a magician, presiding as if an angel, even at night.

“The only trait that Henri Rousseau presents in common with Seurat is the boundless love of independence. But would it not be precisely this love that conveys a message of his exceptional sense of duration and influence? I've told you, speculations of the intellect which command Seurat’s technical knowledge remains foreign to Rousseau. Frankly, Rousseau is uncultivated in the science of drawing, with the very basics taught in primary schools having been denied to him. He is a man of the people, extremely simple, whose approach in painting as well as in life always demonstrates good faith— the cynics will say a candor in the face of all hardship."

This magnificent text of Breton’s is made from fragments of texts assembled and pasted together. [Auction catalogue, 2003].

Bibliography

- André Breton, (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), Inédits I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 233-251.

Creation date22 janv.-46
Bibliographical material

13 pages grand in-4° and 1 page in-8°

Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs - encre bleue crayon rouge et noir
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100030730
Place of origin

Description

Manuscript of the lecture from January 11th, 1946; second of the eight given by André Breton in Haiti.

Arrived in Port-au-Prince with Elisa on December 4th, 1945, Breton gave a series of lectures beginning from December 20th. He had planned eleven lectures, but gave only eight. Here we have the draft of the second, published in Inédits I in the third volume of the Pléiade. This “genealogy tree of Romanticism” presents some German authors which were little known at that time (as Novalis and Achim von Arnim) and focuses on the unknown forbears, particularly on those linked with the hermetic and occultist tradition revived notably in Hugo and Nerval. [Atelier André Breton website, 2005]

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946.
Second Lecture. Autograph manuscript and genealogy tree, January 11th, 1946.

- 10 pages folio in-4° autograph manuscript of the first draft with erasures and corrections:

“It is not betraying any great secret to say that most of the living authors and artists, when listing the cultural heritage of France, are very far from sharing the opinion of most of the teachers of the last two years of high school. With very few exceptions, I always saw them disagree with the idea that the 17th century was doubtless the period culminating in a curve leading towards the staggering decline at the end of the 19th century. For me, I should think that the contrary is true. Without going as far as to underestimate the purity of the language and the high human accents of Racine, let alone the genius of Pascal, I declare that a century of culture, to claim the epithet “great,” must be able to put forth much more convincing arguments than the emancipative virtue of a Boileau and of a La Fontaine. […]

“I have drawn attention again and again to the extraordinary growth of the English novel at the end of the 13th century, known as the terrifying novel, gothic novel, or black novel, and to the extraordinary fascination that this literary genre has later impressed on the most serious minds. The first novels by Victor Hugo along with those by Balzac are directly inspired by Lewis’ Le Moine and Maturin’s Melmoth, the same Melmoth to which Baudelaire referred so often and which became in Les Nuits d'Young a vital source of inspiration for Lautréamont.”

Some pages contain additions, others have been cut by Breton. - Genealogy tree of Romanticism, pencil drawing by André Breton (1 page folio in-4°, attached for the auction). [Auction catalogue, 2003]

Bibliography

- André Breton (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), « [Conférences d'Haïti, II] », [Inédits I], Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, pages 212 à 232.

Creation datejanv.-46
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs et Ds - encre bleue et crayon
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100891080
Place of origin

Description

Manuscript of a lecture by André Breton on December 20th, 1945 à Port-au-Prince; first of a series of eight.

Arrived in Port-au-Prince with Elisa on December 4th, 1945, Breton gave a series of lectures beginning from December 20th, of which we have here the first one, dedicated to Surrealism, to “six hundred young people, most of them being academic students” and some appalled official representatives. For more information about the background of this lecture, see Alentours I in the third volume of the Pléiade. The lecture deals with the history of Surrealism. The beginning of it is of particular interest, as Breton expresses the sense of a deep kinship with the land of Haiti. For more than 20 years, the work of Breton will be characterized by an endeavor to connect the primitive and the modern, the magic and the artistic. [Atelier André Breton website, 2005]

Lectures (Haiti, Martinique) 1945-1946.
First Lecture, autograph manuscript, December 20, 1945.
- 14 pages folio in-4°, manuscript of the first draft with erasures and corrections of this first lecture given by Breton in Haiti.

“Be sure that I am well aware of all that the Haitian people lack. The world map, in 1945, is such that it still brings to light, by historical standards, a disparity in comparison with the others, at least on the physical side. And there are few signs which allow to foresee a leveling of needs and resources on an international scale. In the face of justice we dream — strictly alike for all — and I know that no country is more entitled than Haiti to set for an unrelenting indictment against the more or less disguised exploitation. The glory of its past and of its struggles, which should be a focal point for the rest of the world, is far from having been granted the indispensable external assistance to which it should be entitled by its exceptional energy and vitality.” [Auction catalogue, 2003]

The transcription of this conference is available on “Mécanique universelle”

Bibliography

- André Breton, « Le Surréalisme », Conjonction, Port-au-Prince, 1er janvier 1946, n°1, p. 68.
- André Breton, (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), « Le Surréalisme », [Alentours I], Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, pages 150 à 167, et les Notes, p.1216-1219. Voir aussi, dans le même volume, « [Conférences d'Haïti, I] », [Inédits I], p. 212.

Creation date20 décembre 1945
Bibliographical material14 pages in-4°
Date of publication 1945
LanguagesFrench
Physical description

Ms - encre bleue et couleurs

Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , ,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100266510
Place of origin

Description

Manuscrit d'un entretien qu'André Breton donne au journal Jeunes Antilles le 2 mars 1946, à Fort-de-France.

C'est à la mi-février 1946, plus tôt que prévu, qu'André Breton quitte Port-au-Prince, pressé par la détérioration du climat politique en Haïti. Il rejoint la Martinique, où il était déjà passé cinq ans auparavant. Il y prononcera trois conférences (accomplissant ainsi, sur une deux îles au lieu d'une, le programme qu'il s'était fixé); de ce voyage subsiste aussi l'interview qu'il accorde au journal Jeunes-Antilles, et dont le poète a conservé les questions et ses réponses - il est vrai assez brèves. On peut voir dans le manuscrit que la version publiée dans le périodique (et reprise dans les Alentours I du troisième volume de la Pléiade) est amputée de quatre questions supprimées par André Breton, mais auxquelles il avait cependant répondu. [site Atelier André Breton, 2005]

Manuscrit autographe, Fort-de-France, 2 mars 1946
- 2 pages in-4°, manuscrit autographe daté et signé à l'encre par André Breton, de cette interview à Jeunes Antilles, Fort-de-France, 1946 :
« De vos ouvrages quel est celui que vous préférez ?
» - Assez banalement le dernier en date : Arcane 17.
» - Quels sont les moyens par lesquels vous avez découvert l'écriture automatique ?
» - À partir de ces sortes de monologues, de débits aussi rapides et incontrôlés que possible que la psychanalyse s'efforce d'obtenir du patient et aussi des phrases de demi-sommeil, enfin de certaines formations verbales perçues dans l'état de veille comme si elles étaient prononcées à la cantonade. » [catalogue de la vente, 2003]

Bibliography

- André Breton (Édition de Marguerite Bonnet avec la collaboration de Philippe Bernier, Marie-Claire Dumas, Étienne-Alain Hubert et José Pierre), « Interview de Jeunes Antilles (Fort-de-France) », Alentours I, Œuvres complètes, tome III, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris, Gallimard, 1999, p. 169-171.

Creation date02-mars-46
Bibliographical material2 pages in-4°
Date of publication 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs et Ts - encre bleue
Reference1370000
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2263
Keywords, , , ,
CategoriesManuscripts, Andre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100349170

Description

Cahier élaboré par André Breton de 58 pages de documents et de coupures de presse datés de Port-au-Prince et de Fort-de-France, 1945-1946.

Dossier de presse (des plus abondants) et souvenirs officiels : signée de Henri Seyrig, la lettre de mission de « M. et Mme André Breton » en Haïti atteste le caractère officiel d'un voyage qui est aussi une occasion de revoir Pierre Mabille, en poste comme attaché culturel à Port-au-Prince depuis le mois de juin 1945. Il est d'ailleurs probable que l'ami de Breton soit à l'origine de cette invitation, avec le professeur Laugier, connu avant-guerre, retrouvé à New York, et qui dirige alors les Relations culturelles au ministère des Affaires étrangères. Breton est chargé de « donner des conférences et établir des relations avec les milieux intellectuels ». [site Atelier André Breton, 2005]

Cahier de documents et de coupures de presses, Port au Prince et Fort de France, 1945 - 1946.
- Dossier de documents et de coupures de presse titrés par Breton dans un cahier in-4° relatif aux visites d'André Breton à Port-au-Prince et Fort-de-France (58 pages).

Sont contrecollés avec les coupures de presse et les cartons d'invitation :
- le catalogue d'exposition de Wifredo Lam à Port-au-Prince de janvier à février 1946 comportant un texte de Breton, une photographie originale représentant Breton et Granell (6,8 x 6 cm).
- 2 photographies originales d'un banquet représentant Magloire-Saint-Aude à coté de Breton.
- Une photographie originale représentant André Breton fumant la pipe (17 x 12 cm)
- 3 photographies originales représentant Pierre Mabille et André Breton (9 x 14 cm).
- Une photographie originale d'un mur sur lequel est contrecollée l'affiche de la conférence de Breton (18 x 12, 5 cm).
- L'affiche originale de la conférence de Breton à Fort-de-France (46 x 60 cm).
- 4 photographies originales du gouffre d'Absalon, sur 3 des photographies figurent André Breton (13 x 8 cm).
- Copie d'une lettre du président de la République dominicaine Raphaël L. Trugillo au président d'Haïti Élie Lescot (in-folio imprimé recto verso).
- 4 cartes postales d'Haïti.
- 6 cartes postales d'Haïti (Port-au Prince).
- Un exemplaire de l'édition spéciale du journal La Ruche de Port au Prince du mardi 1er janvier 1946, rendant hommage d'André Breton et à son discours au club Savoy [catalogue de la vente, 2003 et site André Breton, 2014, pour les dates]

On trouve, dans ce cahier de 100 pages dont 58 sont ici reproduites, outre deux numéros de La Ruche, journal d'opposition dont le numéro spécial de janvier 1946 fut interdit, on trouve des coupures de presse d'Haïti Journal, L'Information, Le Soir (journal droitier), Le Nouvelliste, La Phalange, La Nacion, Minoria, La Opinion, une correspondance du Figaro. [site André Breton, 2014]

Sont joints non contrecollés dans le cahier :
- Une lettre tapuscrite d'ordre de mission de l'Ambassade de France pour Monsieur et Madame André Breton, chargé de mission (2 pages in-4°).
- Une lettre autographe d'André Breton de New York, datée du 3 avril 1946 (1/2 page in-4°) : « Il restait que je m'étais trouvé pris dans les remous de la crise haïtienne et j'avais eu beau me réclamer aussitôt de la belle sentence de Toussaint l'Ouverture : "Je suis incapable de servir d'instrument et de jouet aux hommes", d'aucuns n'avaient montré aucun scrupule à user de moi contre mon gré. Tout cela serait moins compréhensible venant d'un autre lieu qu'Haïti où tout ce qui arrive au jour est fallacieux ; à la transparence des bulles à la surface d'un étang. Le véritable ressort d'un pays est dans le tambour vaudou, qui mêle le sentiment d'une détresse sans limite d'une espérance forcenée. » [catalogue de la vente, 2003]

Creation datejanvier - février 1946
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionImpr - cahier de photos, de cartes postales, de lettres et de coupures de presses
Place of origin
Breton Auction, 2003Lot 2260
Keywords, , , , , , , , ,
Set[Albums] Scrapbooks, [AB's Manuscripts] Haïti
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100917970
Place of origin

See also

2 Works
 
False

Discours au "Savoy" (Port-au-Prince)

-
André Breton

-
Manuscrit d'un discours donné le 7 décembre 1945 au banquet du club Savoy dont le texte sera publié dans le journal La Ruche le 14.
Trois images, une notice descriptive, une bibliographie, une collection.

[AB's Manuscripts] Haïti

False

Interview (Haïti-journal)

-
André Breton

-
Manuscrit d'un entretien d'André Breton avec René Bélance qui sera publié dans Haïti-Journal daté des 12 et 13 décembre 1945.
Quatre images, une notice descriptive, une bibliographie, une collection.

[Manuscrits d'AB] Entretiens 1913-1952, [AB's Manuscripts] Haïti

Description

L'art d'aujourd'hui, aboutissement logique de l'art d'hier; c'est de cette remise en perspective historique que part André Breton dans cette conférence de Mexico, pour répondre ensuite à des questions plus actuelles, celles qui lui semblent se poser pour son auditoire :
les pouvoirs et les limites de l'écriture automatique, et la capacité d'un art révolutionnaire à se maintenir dans la durée. La pensée de Hegel est une fois de plus au centre de sa propre réflexion.
Trois pages d'un manuscrit autographe.

 

Creation date26-juin-38
Bibliographical material3 pages in-4° manuscrites à l'encre verte.
Date of publication 1938
LanguagesFrench
Physical descriptionMs
Reference460000
Keywords,
CategoriesAndre Breton's Manuscripts
Set[AB's Manuscripts] Miscellaneous Manuscripts
ExhibitionSérie de conférences en Haïti
Permanent linkhttps://www.andrebreton.fr/en/work/56600100249840